Can you donate eggs after the c section?

Egg donation is a highly regulated part of fertility treatments. It has some dos and don'ts. Nowadays, cesarean delivery is common and women often have a common question that does they donate their eggs after C-section.

C-section or cesarean section is the surgical delivery of a baby. It involves one incision in the mother’s abdomen and another in the uterus. Pregnant women and their family members willingly opt for this to give birth to their child/children.

Cesarean deliveries are generally performed after 39 weeks of pregnancy to provide sufficient time for the child to develop properly. But in some cases, if complications arise, then a cesarean delivery must be performed before 39 weeks on an emergency basis. There are no case studies yet published that C-sections can negatively affect ovulation. Therefore, a woman who wants to be an egg donor after C-section can donate her egg. However, the woman needs to pass the screening process before starts the egg donation process.

The chance of damaging ovaries during a C-section is negligible. In C-section, the abdomen is opened through a vertical cut. Then a horizontal incision is made in the uterus to rupture the amniotic sac surrounding the baby. After rapturing this protective membrane, the baby is removed from the uterus, the umbilical cord is cut, and the placenta is removed. In the C-section, ovaries are not involved at all. Regular ovulation continues and intact women’s fertility after C-section.

C-section associated risks

C-section delivery is a more common type of child delivery procedure used across the globe. But following are some risk factors associated with the C-section:

  • bleeding
  • blood clots
  • infection
  • longer recovery time compared with vaginal birth
  • breathing problems for the child, especially if done before 39 weeks of pregnancy
  • increased risks for future pregnancies
  • injury to the child during surgery
  • surgical injury to other organs
  • adhesions, hernia, and other complications of abdominal surgery

 References

  • https://www.healthline.com/health/c-section#risks
  • https://www.livescience.com/44726-c-section.html

 

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